Month: April 2016

Architectural Tours

Yesterday,I had the pleasure of giving tours of Dupont Circle to two groups of docents from the Portland Art Museum.  They were enthusiastic,asked good questions,and were fun to be with.  Thanks to Nicole to organizing everything.IMG_0018.jpgDC-265-009.jpgDSCN2187.jpg

Limited seating,free squating

Chevy Chase Circle,planned in late 19th century.  Boundary marker between Maryland and District of Columbia is a 20th century replacement (more ornamental) for original markers.  There is another one on the other side of the fountain.IMG_1479.jpg

Former National Trust Headquarters

April 18,2016 photo update. Being converted to headquarters of American Enterprise Institute.IMG_1467 (1).jpg

Secretary of the Treasury Andrew Mellon lived here before World War II, and British art dealer Lord Duveen moved into an apartment below the Mellons, and displayed his art collection to entice Mellon to buy it and he did.

Atlas Obscura Tour

I had the pleasure of giving my tour of Capitol stones today to a very DSCN2675.jpgnice group of people.                                                                            (c)Bill Lebovich,2016

Two Historic and Grand Hotels

The current building for the Willard Hotel, 1401 Pennsylvania Ave.,N.W., 2 blocks east of the White House, dates from 1901 and it was designed by the prominent NYC architect,Henry HardenberghIMG_2413.jpgIMG_2401.jpgIMG_2393.jpgIMG_1418.jpgIMG_1416.jpg.  But earlier,more modest versions of the hotel date to the early 19th century.

With its mansard roof, formal lobby,and grand corridor (“Peacock Alley”) running nearly a block to a secondary entrance on F St.,the hotel evokes Parisian architecture and planning.

On another major avenue, Connecticut Ave, in 1925, the Mayflower Hotel was built, and while its lacks French architectural detailing, it also has a grand promenade running from its lobby to a rear entrance. This hotel also has a formal lobby and is an entire block in depth.  (It differs from the Willard in that the rear section of the Mayflower was originally apartments.)

The Mayflower was designed by the same architects who were responsible for New York City’s Grand Central Terminal, Warren & Wetmore.

Other surviving hotels (seen in next posting),built only a few years later, do not occupy entire blocks and, therefore, lack the promenades that define the interiors and to a large degree, how these two hotels are perceived by guests and visitors.

First three photos:Willard   last two photos:Mayflower   (c)Bill Lebovich,2016

Fire Station 4, San Diego

Designed by local architect Gustav Adolph Hanssen and built in 1937 by the United States Works Progress Administration,this fire station is marked by its prominent hose drying tower (see view looking up the no longer used tower) and blocky square and vaguely Art Deco detailing, such as chevrons grooved panels between first floor doors and second floor windows on projecting end blocks and tower.  But the most interesting and unusual detail is the hexagonal opening for the pole used by the firefighters to quickly get to the fire engine from the second floor,which is sleeping quarters.  I have never seen any other like this one.  ( I use the spelling of his first name and his full middle name as done in Un. of Illinois alumni publications.  San Diego publications refer to him as Gustave A. Hanssen.)IMG_0823.jpgIMG_0821.jpgIMG_0819.jpgIMG_0689.jpgIMG_0688.jpgIMG_0819.jpg,

Sewell-Belmont House, Capitol Hill,Washington,DC

IMG_1130.jpgIMG_1131.jpgIMG_1129.jpgIMG_1132.jpgMission Statement

The Sewall-Belmont House & Museum, on Capitol Hill in Washington DC, celebrates women’s progress toward equality—and explores the evolving role of women and their contributions to society—through educational programs, tours, exhibits, research and publications.

The historic National Woman’s Party (NWP), a leader in the campaign for equal rights and women’s suffrage, owns, maintains and interprets the Sewall-Belmont House and Museum. One of the premier women’s history sites in the country, this National Historic Landmark houses an extensive collection of suffrage banners, archives and artifacts documenting the continuing effort by women and men of all races, religions and backgrounds to win voting rights and equality for women under the law.

The Sewall-Belmont House & Museum and the National Woman’s Party are committed to preserving the legacy of Alice Paul, founder of the NWP and author of the Equal Rights Amendment, and telling the untold stories for the benefit of scholars, current and future generations of Americans, and all the world’s citizens.  “