Category: 19th century monumental architecture

Architectural walking tours of Washington,D.C.

Bill Lebovich, former National Park Service historian, architectural historian and photographer, and former adjunct college faculty member, gives weekday and weekend tours of Lafayette Square, Embassy Row, Dupont Circle, Capitol Hill, Georgetown, historic downtown and museums, and custom tours.

To schedule a tour, get additional information, reviews, DSCN2867.jpgor ask questions, email me at architecturalphoto@mac.com or call (301) 467-2831.

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Kemp Hall and the possible secession of Maryland from the Union

Kemp Hall and the possible secession of Maryland from the Union

On April 13,1861, U. S. Army Major Robert Anderson surrendered Ft. Sumter, Charleston,South Carolina, to the Confederacy.  On April 27th, the Maryland Senate and House of Delegates convened at Kemp Hall, corner of E. Church  and N. Market Streets, Frederick, to discuss whether Maryland should follow the southern states and secede from the Union.  The senators and delegates never voted on the issue.  Lincoln had his troops arrest the pro-Secessionists members of the Maryland General Assembly, preventing the august body from having the necessary quorum for taking a vote.

The building is a distinctive revival building of approximately 1860 with arched window heads and wide, bracketed cornice.  It is connected by a lower, setback hyphen with circular window to the third building, along Church.  This building is slightly lower than the hyphen building, which in turn is slightly lower than the main building.  Only the main building has arched windows.  The glass store front covers the N. Market St. facade and part of the Church St. facade, which has later brickwork.

National Museum of African American History,2016

IMG_4897.jpgFlanked by tower of late 19th century Old Post Office,on Pennsylvania Ave, on the left and the early to mid 19th century US Capitol Building, Capitol Hill, on the right.

How the articulation of monumental architecture changes with the architectural taste at the period of design, the intended symbolism of the building, its location, and the social and political attitudes when the project was conceived.

Atlas Obscura Tour

I had the pleasure of giving my tour of Capitol stones today to a very DSCN2675.jpgnice group of people.                                                                            (c)Bill Lebovich,2016