Category: architectural photography

Georgetown’s late 18th, early 19th century domestic architecture

One of the most popular rows for tourists is also one of the best rows.  The power of simple motifs repeated down the row creates a sense of harmony, rhythm, and horizontal and vertical movement.  No American architectural style achieved so much with such restraint.  In most periods, such as classical revival, Richardsonian Romanesque — all great styles, and the post modernismGeorgetownIMG_5488_DxOVP (1).jpg, architects depend on bold statements to say their design is important architecture.

Art Deco beauty in Philadelphia

This is a detail from the 1929/1930 (different sources give different dates for completion) skyscraper in downtown Philadelphia.  It has been converted from an office building to a Marriot Hotel.  Ritter & Shay were the architects.

The panels beautifully express the boldness, originality,and exuberance of the Art Deco—-at the beginning of the Great Depression.Market Street Nat. Bank.jpg

1785 Massachusetts Ave.,NW

Designed by Jules Henri deSibour, one of Washington,DC’s finest architects of the early 20th century, 1785 was home to Andrew Mellon when he was Secretary of Treasury. It is believed he occupied the entire top floor.  The British Art Dealer Lord Duveen rented the floor below and displayed his art collection.  He invited Mellon to view it and the approach worked.  Mellon bought the collection, which became the basis of National Gallery of Art.

The building was the headquarters of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.  As the Trust was selling the building, the Trust hired me to photograph the building for the HABS Collection at the Library of Congress.  I took more than 200  4 x5 black and white archival processed negatives and an archival print of each negative.

The American Enterprise Institute bought the building, joining Brookings, John Hopkins,and Carnegie Institute as some of the think tanks along this section of Massachusetts Ave., between 17th and 18th Streets.

The first photo (black and white) is from April 2014.  The second photo is from November 2016.DC-265 7.jpg1785 Mass AEI.jpg

Photographing in New York City

The guy  in shorts and t-shirt gets off his rental bike, sets up a sturdy tripod and expensive camera, stands on the  coffee shop Flatiron Building 12.jpgchair to get a higher vantage point and takes a photo looking north from Daniel Burnham’s Flatiron Building.

Only in Manhattan.

Architectural Photography/Architectural History Tour of Embassy Row

Saturday, November 12,2016, 10am-12:30pm

To make compelling architectural photographs, one has to understand architectural history.

This tour places the buildings and spaces in context and demonstrates the photographic techniques used to capture photographs that convey the significance of the buildings.

Participants should bring their own cameras (digital or film, any format).

$20/per person.

For further information contact Bill Lebovich:architecturalphoto@mac.comIMG_3189.jpg (c)Bill Lebovich,2016

Marcel Breuer’s American Press Institute Building (1974-2016)

A rather modest project, in terms of size, for Breuer, it had his characteristic textured concrete walls and windows recessed in  concrete frames, evoking as always the three dimensional quality of concrete and his designsIMG_4052.jpgIMG_4072.jpgMarcel Breuer's American Press Institute (Corrected)_DxOVP.jpgCCI24082016_2 (1).jpg.  It had a nice sense of movement as it undulated along the crest of the land and a quiet dignity.  And it has a pleasing tautness.   Reston,VA.